The All New 1967 Studebakers: Brooks Stevens’ Skyview Wagon

Click on the anaglyph stereo 3D image to launch a Flash player and view the entire gallery of photos in 2D or your choice of S-3D formats.

We’ve been looking at how a hypothetical Studebaker showroom might have looked like in 1967, if the company had survived. Though financially strapped, in the early 1960s the company turned to two great designers for a series of concepts that would have given Studebaker a full line up of modern cars by 1967. We’ve already looked at the full size sedans based Avanti styling themes executed by the Raymond Loewy studio and fabricated by Pichon-Parat in France. The other designer was Brooks Stevens. After freshening the production Studebakers, Stevens started designing three very crisp and sharp looking mid-sized concepts, a wagon, sedan and two-door. The budget was tight, only $50,000 for fabrication, but Stevens found a small coachbuilder in Turin, Sibona-Bassano (though the badges are spelled Basano) who was willing to fab the prototypes for only $16,500 each. To give you an idea of how cheap that was, in 1950, over a decade earlier, Ghia charged Chrysler $10K for the XX-500, the first of the Chrysler Ghia concepts and at the time Virgil Exner jumped at that bargain. The wagon features Steven’s sliding roof from the production ’63 Wagonaire he designed, and symmetrical diagonally swappable doors, which would have cut production costs, a feature that would show up on other Studebaker concepts. For a fuller story about the Studebaker Skyview concept, read Marty Densch’s post from last February.

Click on the anaglyph stereo 3D image to launch a Flash player and view the entire gallery of photos in 2D or your choice of S-3D formats.

Share
This entry was posted in 3D Imagery, 3D Photos, Concept Cars, Museums, Studebaker and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply