Tucker Tuesday: Tucker #8

To view the entire photo gallery in your choice of 2D or stereo 3D formats, click here for a Flash player or here for an HTML applet

When Tucker #43 (of 51 made, with 47 extant) sold for almost $3 million (including fees) at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale auction a few months ago it got a lot of attention. Before that sale, Tuckers have generally changed hands for right around a million dollars plus or minus a couple hundred thou. Now #43 was a particularly nice Tucker, properly restored, and it was being sold by noted collector Ron Pratte, but people still wondered if it set a new price floor for Tuckers. I asked Mark Lieberman, a Detroit area Tucker enthusiast and expert, who has owned a couple of Tuckers and consulted on the restoration of others, about the B-J sale. He said that #43 is one of the best and might be an outlier. Lieberman said to pay attention to the sale of Tucker #34 at the Amelia Island auction, that #34 was an nice but not perfect Tucker and that it’s price would be a better barometer than the Pratte Tucker. Well Gooding’s Amelia Island auction has come and go, and #34 sold for $1.32 million.

Two of the Tucker's safety features were the "safety cell" for the front passenger, and a padded dash.

To view the entire photo gallery in your choice of 2D or stereo 3D formats, click here for a Flash player or here for an HTML applet

There are many cars that are rarer than a Tucker. The Hudson Italia at the Eyes On Design show last year is one of 26 made, one of 19 that still exists. The SD 396 Beaumont convertible at the same show was one of only 65 made in 1969, and surely not many convertible versions of the Canadian 396 Chevelle have survived. Neither of those cars, though, has the story that the Tucker has. George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola never made a move about the Hudson Italia.

You don't often get to see that Tuckers have suicide doors in the back.

To view the entire photo gallery in your choice of 2D or stereo 3D formats, click here for a Flash player or here for an HTML applet

We’re going to be featuring Tuckers today, starting with #1008, owned by Richard Driehaus’s Chicago Vintage Motor Carriage. CVMC’s curator, Stephen Murphy was gracious enough to give me almost unfettered access to #8, one of the more correct Tuckers around. Many of the surviving Tuckers have been modified to stay on the road, since the unique parts no longer were available. Some parts, for example the rubber suspension components that the Tucker featured, are now being reproduced and the Tucker fleet is slowly being restored to original condition.

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