1955 Packard Four Hundred – 3D Photos

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To view the entire photo gallery in 2D or your choice of stereo 3D formats, click here for a Flash player , here for an HTML applet, or here for an HTML5 viewer

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1956 Packard 400 – 3D Photos

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For 1955, Packard finally introduced a true pillarless two door hardtop to complement the four door Patrician. They named it the Four Hundred, a model designation that Packard had used before but this time they spelled it out.

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1955 Packard Caribbean Convertible – 3D Photos

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The primary visual difference between the 1955 and 1956 Packards is that the ’56 model year cars have longer “eyelids”, the hoods over the headlights were extended a bit.

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1956 Packard Executive – 3D Photos

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In 1955, Packard chief James Nance tried to reestablish Packard as a premium luxury brand. Since the 1930s, company managers focused on the high volume “junior” Packards and let Cadillac dominate the luxury market. For 1955, there were be two lines, Packards and Clippers, and though they shared most components and styling, Packards and Clippers were fairly easy to tell from one another. When dealers rebelled about the Clippers not carrying the Packard brand anywhere on the car, Nance relented. Packard also introduced the Executive, which was positioned between the Clippers and the Caribbean, Four Hundred and Patrician, and it combined the front end of a Packard with the rear end of Clipper (it has “slipper” taillights, not the “cathedral” style as on the more expensive Packards). Still, Clippers outsold Packards in 1956 by a ratio of three to one.

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1956 Packard Caribbean Convertible – 3D Photos

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Why spend six figures on a restored 1957 Chevy convertible when, for the same money, you can drive in real style? This 1956 Packard Caribbean not only looks great, with its twin carb setup, the 374 cubic inch V8 puts out 310 horsepower, the most offered by any manufacturer in the day.

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1956 Packard Caribbean Hardtop – 3D Photos

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The Caribbeans are the most collectible of the last Packards, at least based on auction prices. A nicely restored convertible Caribbean can fetch $150,000.

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1953 Packard Balboa

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To accompany a post of mine over at TTAC about the last Packards, we’re going to put up some posts about the 1955 and 1956 Packards, which looked brand new but actually recycled the basic body shell Packard had been using since 1951. For comparison purposes, here’s a 1953 Packard Balboa.

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Automotive Oddities: A Yugo (Still on the Road?)

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Lists of ‘best’ or ‘worst’ cars are always subjective, of course, and influenced strongly, if not entirely, by the biases of the writer.  Look at every list of ‘worst’ cars you can lay your hands on, though, and one car appears on every single one: The Yugo GV.  This one was spotted this weekend at a car show in Kenosha, Wis.

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The First Practical Airbags Were Crash Tested Here – 3D Photos

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Automotive supplier Eaton Corporation hasn’t been in the airbag business in almost 40 years. They abandoned that market in 1975 after slow acceptance by the auto industry and by consumers convinced them that it wasn’t worth the approximately $135 million that they and their customers had invested in the Auto-Ceptor restraint system, the first practical airbags. The crash test site where they developed those airbags still exists, though, just across the street from Eaton’s Southfield, Michigan technical center. Much of the site is intact, with both head-on and pole-impact barriers, as well as the remnants of the guide track used to run test sleds into the barrier.

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Joe Hornacek’s 1931 Ford Model A “Good Humors” Truck

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The name Good Humor originated from the fact that company founder Harry Burt wanted to capitalize on the idea that one’s “humors”, one’s disposition, was related to the flavors of the foods one ate. Additionally, the word humor then had a secondary meaning of flavor. As a result, some of the early Good Humor trucks had the lettering as “Good Humors”. When Joe Hornacek found this ice cream truck in pieces in a barn near Port Huron, Michigan, he thought it was too far gone to restore. When he laid out all of the pieces, though, he realized that he had just about a complete car and he set about rebuilding it, starting with a new ash wood frame for the freezer. Once that was finished, Horncek discovered that whoever the independent coachbuilder it was that made the freezer box in the first place, did so by hand and some panels were as much as an inch off of being square so the side panels of the freezer body had to be fabricated. The lettering was taken from a photo, at the Smithsonian, of a 1930 Ford Good Humor truck.

As you can see from the previous post about a 1973 Good Humor truck, it’s not that unusual to see a vintage Good Humor truck at a car event. However, finding one based on a Model T is a pretty rare experience. The Packard Proving Grounds’ Cars R Stars car show had commercial vehicles as a special category this year, which presented Hornacek with the perfect opportunity to display the finished truck in public for the first time. To go with his truck, Joe had an appropriate uniform with a Good Humor cap, a bow-tie and a white shirt, the buttons of which were almost bursting with pride.

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